The Photosynthesis Effect

By Elmer Beauregard
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In my quest to find out what CO2 levels actually are in Minnesota I purchased my own CO2 meter and I have been having fun with it ever since. The good people at CO2meter.com said you should let it run all day and see what happens. I did and much to my surprise I noticed that CO2 levels vary greatly in just one day.
During the day CO2 levels drop at a pretty steady rate, as plants grow during the day they consume CO2 and in turn emit oxygen for us to breath. This is called Photosynthesis and is the engine that drives life on this planet. It is a symbiotic relationship between animals and plants which I believe is God designed. How could something this complicated and well designed happen by chance?
What I think is interesting about this chart however is the dramatic spike in CO2 levels around sunset. CO2 levels go from a low of 378 ppm at 7 PM to a high of 462 ppm just after 9 PM. (sunset was at 7:51 PM). This is a 84 PPM or 18% increase in just 2 hours.
There are no man made influences shown on this chart. It was a very nice day here in Minnesota, we weren’t running any air conditioners or furnaces, there were no fires no grilling this is just nature doing its thing. Plus, I have noticed this spike every night when taking measurements.
I’m sure all of you climate scientist reading this know all about the Photosynthesis Effect and have many arguments on why natural daily variations are meaningless. But when I see how much natural variability in CO2 levels there are in one day, I don’t think there is a need to panic over a 1 PPM increase in CO2 every year at Mauna Loa.